www.albasrah.net
 

GI Special:

thomasfbarton@earthlink.net

10.24.04

Print it out (color best).  Pass it on.

 

GI SPECIAL 2#C1

 

 

Pin From Vietnam Days:

True Then, True Now

(Thanks to John Gingerich)

 

 

Soldier Harassed;

Kills Himself

 

From: Soldier, Sunni area

To: GI Special

Sent: Wednesday, October 20, 2004 6:58 AM

Subject: This story in GI Special about Diyala Suicide:

 

 

FROM GI SPECIAL, Oct 20, 2004:

 

U.S. Soldier Found Dead In Diyala

 

10.19.04 ABC News

 

Meanwhile, a 1st Infantry Division Soldier died from a non-combat injury at a base in Diyala province, the U.S. military said Tuesday.

 

The soldier was found at late Sunday in his living quarters after he did not return to his guard post.  The incident is under investigation.

 

 

-this "investigation" was unfortunately a suicide.  it happened at a FOB in our area of operations.  no tangible reason why he shot himself, although life at that FOB is mundane and depressing, that and the surrounding area is rather violent.

 

what’s interesting is this is the first suicide of our brigade's deployment.  by this time in kosovo over a year ago, we already had 4 suicides. i'm interested in the psychology of suicidal individuals during a conflict.  is a reality of the life and death ambiance of this war actually preventing more suicides?

 

we attend occasional suicide prevention classes, especially during deployments.  the usual reasons are when a soldier discovers his wife is cheating on him, or mainly just depression.

 

MORE:

 

From: Soldier, Sunni area

To: GI Special

Sent: Thursday, October 21, 2004 8:03 AM

Subject: Re: Diyala suicide

 

hey man,

 

well it turns out that the kid has been harassed and hazed for over a year now.  the unit he was in is a rough outfit of infantrymen.  their leadership has always been shady swine. 

 

everyone know this kid has been harassed for a long time, and now that it all went down, no changes will be made.  it’s the army way.

 

Our "Real" Army Leadership Values...

 

Lies

Deceit

Rank

Selfish Service

Hypocrisy

Ignorance

Prejudice

 

anyways, this is a serious matter.  i’m going to do my own research into the accurate suicide statistics.

 

yeah man, go with it.  this shit needs to be heard.  hazing makes me fuckin sick!

 

ok.  enough for now.

 

fight to survive

 

NEED SOME TRUTH?  CHECK OUT TRAVELING SOLDIER

Telling the truth - about the occupation, the cuts to veterans’ benefits, or the dangers of depleted uranium - is the first reason Traveling Soldier is necessary.  But we want to do more than tell the truth; we want to report on the resistance - whether it's in the streets of Baghdad, New York, or inside the armed forces.  Our goal is for Traveling Soldier to become the thread that ties working-class people inside the armed services together. We want this newsletter to be a weapon to help you organize resistance within the armed forces. If you like what you've read, we hope that you'll join with us in building a network of active duty organizers.  http://www.traveling-soldier.org/  And join with Iraq War vets in the call to end the occupation and bring our troops home now! (www.ivaw.net)

 

 

IRAQ WAR REPORTS:

 

 

Gloria Salazar, mother of Las Vegas Marine Cpl. William I. Salazar, cries on the coffin of her 26-year-old son Oct. 23, 2004, at the Resurrection Cemetery in San Gabriel, Calif. He was assigned to Headquarters Battalion, 1st Marine Division, 1st Expeditionary Force, Camp Pendleton, Calif. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

 

 

Update: 7 U.S. Troops Wounded In Attack On Mosul Mosque

 

MOSUL, Iraq, Oct 22 (AFP)

 

An Iraqi was killed Friday and nine people wounded, including seven US soldiers, in clashes and bomb attacks near a mosque in the northern Iraqi city of Mosul, according to the military and medics.

 

US troops were pulling out from around the Thul-Nurain mosque in the city centre when a roadside bomb hit their convoy, wounding five soldiers, the military said.

 

Hundreds of Iraqis gathered outside the mosque to protest the operation chanting "God is greatest," and "down with the occupation" as troops fired rubber bullets in an effort to disperse them.

 

Some people were seen pelting Iraqi forces with stones.

 

The military said two US soldiers and an Iraqi civilian were wounded in the clashes.

 

The imam of the mosque, Sheikh Rayan Tawfic, who heads the local chapter of the influential Sunni Committee of Muslim Scholars, and some of his followers barricaded themselves inside.

 

 

Baya Baghdad Bradley Burning,

Six Wounded

 

Burning Bradley that was attacked along the highway leading to the airport in Baghdad. (AFP/Awad Awad)

 

October 23, 2004 (AEST)

 

A roadside bomb blew up near a US military patrol in Baghdad today, wounding six soldiers, the military said in a statement.  Witnesses said guerrillas had hit the vehicle with grenades.

 

It said the attack occurred in western Baghdad at about 7:15am local time and gave no other details.

 

Reuters television footage showed flames and smoke pouring from a US Bradley fighting vehicle in the south-western Baya district on a highway leading to Baghdad international airport.

 

 

NO MORE.  BRING THEM ALL HOME NOW!

Black Hawk helicopter belonging to the 45th Medical Company, based in Babylon, Iraq, on Wednesday. — John Moore / AP photo

 

 

Aging Radar Useless Against Resistance Mortars

 

October 25, 2004 By Megan Scully, Special to the Army Times

 

Before the Army deployed its 20-year-old AN/TPQ-37 Firefinder Weapon Locating System to Iraq, the service developed new software to bring the system up to date.  But at least one operational unit said the upgraded system failed to do what it was intended to do: detect mortar rounds.

 

For soldiers in 1st Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment, the TPQ-37 was more of a problem than an asset.  The unit came under mortar fire 40 times in Iraq, but the system detected rounds only three times.  The squadron suffered between 10 and 15 injuries from mortars.

 

“We stopped, we moved the radar around, the technical guys around worked the [software] programming,” said Lt. Col. Gregory Reilly, the squadron’s leader.  “We tried everything humanly possible.”

 

The unit even fired its own mortars at the system in an attempt to work out the bugs.  [Which is about all it’s good for: target practice.]  Even under the best circumstances, the radar detected only one out of five rounds. “I just don’t think there was fidelity in the system,” Reilly said.

 

Thales Raytheon System’s Q-37 Firefinder radar, which can be transported on a 2.5-ton truck, was first fielded in the 1980s to detect rounds from long-range Soviet artillery up to 30 miles away.

 

The enemy also has adapted their tactics to defeat the radars, using “nontraditional trajectories and nonstandard launchers,” Bowman said.

 

Moreover, the Q-37 was built to protect division-size units.  Five apiece would cover an entire front line.  But in Iraq, the friendly units are smaller and the enemies more mobile. The Firefinders have been parceled out to brigades, typically one each.  Offering only 90-degree coverage, the Q-37 leaves part of the battlefield uncovered, Bowman said.

 

The Army’s teams also are working on software problems with the TPQ-36, which has been picking up too much “clutter,” or interference.

 

 

Tank, 2 Humvees Destroyed In Falluja:

Occupation Arrests Official

 

23 October 2004 Aljazeera.net & Iraq, Oct. 22 Xinhuanet

 

US forces used warplanes and artillery in the bombardments and militias reacted with rocket-propelled grenades in the suburban areas, where witnesses saw a US tank and two Humvees destroyed.

 

Aljazeera has learned that US troops arrested Mahmud al-Jarassi, deputy governor of Falluja when he arrived in the city on Saturday morning.

 

 

Mosul Bombers Change Tactics

 

October 25, 2004 By Matthew Cox, Army Times staff writer

 

MOSUL, Iraq — Suicide bombers steering explosives-laden vehicles have launched two deadly attacks on U.S. forces in a tactic Army leaders here say that until recently has been confined to the south.

 

In the Oct. 13 attack, the insurgent waited in an alley as an Army convoy of three Humvees rumbled along a main road about 2:20 p.m. in the northeastern section of the city.  After the first Humvee passed, the insurgent sped from the alley and slammed his vehicle into the side of the second Humvee.

 

“That’s a tactic that has been used down south, but we have not seen it here until now,” said Col. Tom Knight, deputy commander of Task Force Olympia.

 

 

 

TROOP NEWS

 

 

GI Special Apologies To Top Military Commanders In Iraq;

We Had It Wrong

 

[Last week, GI Special reported that over $30 million handled by top military commanders in Iraq is missing, and no documentation can be found for what they did with the money.

 

[We apologize to each and all of them.  As you will see in the news story below, the correct amount of money handled by top military commanders in Iraq which is missing, and for which no documentation can be found, is $100 million.

 

[That will make the military families who have to beg friends, relatives and strangers for money to visit wounded soldiers, feel a lot better.

 

[To avoid any suspicion the commanders pocketed the money, no doubt they will be willing to make all personal and family financial records available immediately to the public and the press.  Being brave noble patriots and all that, how could any honest high officer possibly object?

 

[The traitors who refuse to do so could be brought before a jury made up of relatives of wounded soldiers for appropriate punishment.  Since they have military skills, perhaps those thieving fucks could serve out their sentences cleaning up DU.  Needless to say, for those cases where it may be proven the money was split with the resistance, and used to buy weapons to kill U.S. soldiers, battlefield court-marshal and summary execution would be appropriate.

 

[By the way, does your commanding officer have a new Rolex?]

 

Iraq Audit Can't Find Billions

 

October 16, 2004 By Bryan Bender, Boston Globe Staff

 

WASHINGTON -- About half of the roughly $5 billion in Iraq reconstruction funds disbursed by the US government in the first half of this year cannot be accounted for, according to an audit commissioned by the United Nations, which could not find records for numerous rebuilding projects and other payments.

 

Hundreds of projects worth more than $100 million covered by the Commander's Emergency Response Program, designed to allow US military officers to quickly fund small reconstruction projects around the country, had either no contracts on file, no evidence that bids were obtained through competition, no purchase invoices, or no payment vouchers.

 

One chunk of the money -- $1.4 billion -- was deposited into a local bank by Kurdish leaders in northern Iraq but could be tracked no further: The auditors reported that they were shown a deposit slip but could find no additional records to explain how the money was used or to prove that it remains in the bank.

 

Auditors also said they could not track more than $1 billion in funds doled out by US authorities for hundreds of large and small reconstruction projects.

 

All the funds -- more than $5 billion -- were spent between Jan. 1 and June 28, 2004, during the period when the US-led Coalition Provisional Authority ran the country.

 

The audit reported numerous instances of improper disbursement practices by the coalition authority. Among the findings:

 

Do you have a friend or relative in the service?  Forward this E-MAIL along, or send us the address if you wish and we’ll send it regularly.  Whether in Iraq or stuck on a base in the USA, this is extra important for your service friend, too often cut off from access to encouraging news of growing resistance to the war, at home and in Iraq.  Send requests to address up top.

 

 

NYC Labor Against War Salutes GI Resistance

 

21 Oct 2004 NYCLAW

 

(The following message from New York City Labor Against the War was presented at the October 17 Million Worker March by Michael Letwin, NYCLAW co-convener, and former president of UAW Local 2325/Association of Legal Aid Attorneys.)

 

Ever since 9/11, New York City Labor Against the War has resisted the exploitation of our suffering at Ground Zero as a cynical pretext for the war of terror, conquest and empire waged by both the Bush administration and Democratic politicians on working people abroad and at home.

 

So we are proud to participate in the Million Worker March initiated by Clarence Thomas of ILWU Local 10, and proud that one of the march's co-chairs is Brenda Stokely, president of AFSCME DC 1707, and a co-convener of NYCLAW.

 

Now the Million Worker March may not have support of AFL-CIO or John Kerry.  But it is part of a much greater power: worldwide resistance to empire.

 

We have seen that resistance as ordinary Iraqis in Falluja, Najaf and Sadr City fight a brutal U.S. occupation of bombing and torture that has left tens of thousands of Iraqis and G.I.s dead and maimed.

 

We have seen resistance in Jenin, Ramallah and Jabaliya, where, like David against Goliath, Palestinians armed with rocks oppose tanks, Apache helicopters and F-16s -- provided through U.S. tax dollars and union pension funds -- in order to end Israeli apartheid and ethnic cleansing, and for right to return to their homes throughout historic Palestine.

 

We have seen resistance as the largest mass protests in history have taken place across the globe.

 

We have seen it in the establishment of U.S. Labor Against the War and in the growing number of unions -- including AFSCME, APWU, CWA, MHU, and SEIU -- that have gone on record against the war in Iraq.

 

We have seen it in the work of Vietnam Veterans Against the War, Military Families Speak Out, and Iraq Veterans Against the War.

 

And we certainly saw it last Wednesday when, after nearly 1,100 G.I. deaths, an entire platoon of the 343rd Quartermaster Company from Rock Hill, South Carolina, refused to carry out orders for a suicidal convoy in Iraq -- a courageous act that foreshadows the kind of G.I. revolt which crippled the U.S. war machine in Vietnam.  We send these G.I.s a special salute.

 

In other words, the Million Worker March is part of a growing worldwide movement that will:

 

**End U.S. occupation of Iraq and Bring the Troops Home Now.

 

**End imperial wars and occupations in Afghanistan, Palestine, the Philippines, Colombia, Korea, Haiti, Puerto Rico -- and everywhere else.

 

**Fight against the war being waged at home against workers, immigrants, civil rights and civil liberties.

 

Let's let all the G.I.s know that we want them home now!

 

Thank you.

 

What do you think?  Comments from service men and women, and veterans, are especially welcome.  Send to contact@militaryproject.org.  Name, I.D., withheld on request.  Replies confidential.

 

 

Intel Chief Says Millions Fighting U.S. Empire

 

October 25, 2004 By Vince Crawley, Army Times staff writer

 

Lt. Gen. Keith Alexander, the Army’s deputy chief of staff for intelligence, told reporters The Army also is developing the ability to send information in real time, while the unit is on the move.  Future rotations might include a link with intelligence officers assigned to follow-on forces, so they can follow the ebb and flow of the battlefield before arriving there.

 

The changes are part of a massive rethinking of how the military collects data on potential enemies, Alexander said.

 

During the Cold War, finding Soviet military units “was an easy job,” he said. “If you have a lot of moving parts, a lot of dust, a lot of emitters, it’s easy.”

 

Much harder, he said, is trying to track down terrorists, which he described as “trying to find a group within millions that are bent on doing harm to this country and our way of life.”

 

 

Coronado Grad Injured

 

October 23, 2004 Darren Meritz, El Paso Times

 

A 20-year-old Marine from El Paso on his second tour of duty in Iraq was seriously injured while on patrol near Fallujah, family members said Friday.

 

Lance Cpl. Francisco Paz Jr., a 2002 graduate of Coronado High School who was married about two months ago, was ambushed while in a Humvee, cousin Daniel Silva said.  Silva said he believed that two other members of Paz's unit were killed in the attack.

 

Paz, who is in intensive care at the Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., received injuries to his neck, shoulder, arms and legs, Silva said.

 

"Right now he's OK, but he's still serious. He's got a long way to recovery," Silva said.

 

 

Convicted Sgt's Wife Blames Command For Iraq Abuse

 

October 22, 2004 Associated Press

 

The wife of an Army reservist sentenced to prison for abusing prisoners in Iraq said she knows her husband did wrong, but she also blames the abuse on higher-ranking officials who "sit behind the curtains."

 

"The pain sets deeper yet in knowing that he serves these years not only for his actions or actions of a few reservists, but those included in the chain of command," she wrote in an e-mail to The Associated Press.

 

Her 38-year-old husband, of Buckingham, Va., received the stiffest punishment given so far in the scandal.  But she questioned why her husband's superiors were not punished for what she said was their complicity on the abuse.

 

"I feel outrage that he and a few others will bear the weight for the actions of many," she wrote.

 

 

The Rumsfeld Rule

 

October 25, 2004 By Rick Maze, Army Times staff writer

 

Rep. John Murtha, D-Pa., the House Appropriations defense subcommittee’s senior Democrat and a frequent ally of Republicans on national security issues, said a young sergeant told him there’s a rule in the field that “you say nothing against the war or you get fired.”  The sergeant said troops call that the “Rumsfeld rule,” referring to Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld.

 

 

Fuck The Alamo?

 

Army Times 10.25.04

 

They’ll remember the Alamo

 

Tourists at the Alamo saw something besides historical exhibits at the shrine to Texas independence.

 

An Alamo security officer caught two soldiers having sex near a public viewing area Oct. 10, police said.

 

The report said an 18-year-old woman and a 19-year-old man were partially clad when the officer apprehended them after several tourists watched the couple and became upset.

 

The pair are both members of the 232nd Medical Battalion at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Their ranks were not available at press time.  They were charged with public lewdness, according to the San Antonio Express-News.

 

 

Report Rips Mississippi Air National Guard

 

[USA Today, October 22, 2004]  Air National Guard officers in Meridian, Miss., padded payrolls, ran an illicit liquor store and misstated the unit's training level so it could participate in a mission in Afghanistan, according to an investigation just completed by a staff judge advocate for the Florida Air National Guard.

 

 

Army Plan Would Let Halliburton Crooks Keep Billions

 

[Wall Street Journal, October 22, 2004, Pg. 1] The Army is laying the groundwork to let Halliburton Co. keep several billion dollars it was paid for work in Iraq that Pentagon auditors say is questionable for not supported by proper documentation.  [Well they’re George’s friends.  What do you think the government is for anyway?]

 

 

 

IRAQ RESISTANCE ROUNDUP

 

 

Occupation Admits Huge Increase In Resistance Troops:

Recruiting No Problem, Profile Finds Insurgents Stronger

 

October 22, 2004 By Eric Schmitt and Thom Shanker, New York Times

 

Senior American officials are beginning to assemble a new portrait of the insurgency that has continued to inflict casualties on American and Iraqi forces, showing that it has significantly more fighters and far greater financial resources than previously estimated.

 

When foreign fighters and the network of a Jordanian militant, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, are counted with home-grown insurgents, the hardcore resistance numbers between 8,000 and 12,000 people, a tally that grows to more than 20,000 when active sympathizers or covert accomplices are included, according to the American officials.

 

These estimates contrast sharply with earlier intelligence reports, in which the number of insurgents has varied from as few as 2,000 to a maximum of 7,000 fighters.  The revised estimate is influencing the military campaign in Iraq, but has not prompted a wholesale review of the strategy, officials said.

 

Brig. Gen. John DeFreitas III of the Army, the military's senior intelligence officer in Iraq, said in an interview in Baghdad: "It's detective work and it's very difficult work." DeFreitas, who is a former chief intelligence officer for the American military in South Korea and for the secretive U.S. Special Operations Command, called it "a challenge for the U.S. military to use tools, well designed for maneuver warfare, against an insurgency.  Insurgents don't show up in satellite imagery very well."  [No shit?]

 

Even as American attacks are killing dozens of fighters and some leadership figures every week, officials said, insurgents in many parts of Iraq have been able to promote lieutenants into higher leadership roles and are able to attract a steady stream of recruits.

 

 

Key Collaborator Leader Killed

 

October23, 2004 by Juan Cole, published by Informed Consent

 

On Wednesday, a leading member of the Iraqi National Accord was assassinated.  Mazin al-Samarra'i, a prominent member of the political party of caretaker Prime Minister Iyad Allawi, had played a role in the negotiations between the government and the people of Samarra during the recent clashes there.

 

This news is more alarming than will be generally recognized.  Here we have someone from the Prime Minister's own party, and who was a prominent negotiator at Samarra' (also the home town of Interior Minister Falah al-Naqib).  If such an individual can be killed easily and with impunity, then no one is safe, including Allawi himself.

 

 

16 Occupation Cops Killed At Al-Asad

 

23 October 2004 Aljazeera.net & By Robert H. Reid, ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

A car bomb has exploded at an Iraqi police station near a US marine base in western Iraq, killing up to 16 policemen.  Fifty were wounded.

 

Marine Lieutenant Lyle Gilbert said the blast occurred at about 7am at an Iraqi police post near al-Asad camp, about 180km northwest of Baghdad, between the towns of Hiyt and Haditha.  He said there were no US casualties.

 

 

Four Occupation Guards Dead At Al-Ishaqi

 

23 October 2004 Aljazeera.net

 

Saturday a bomber blew up his vehicle near a checkpoint manned by Iraqi National Guards north of Baghdad, killing four guards, an Iraqi National Guard officer said.

 

He said six guards were also wounded when the bomb exploded in the village of Ishaqi, near the city of Samarra, 100km north of Baghdad.

 

 

Resistance Trashes Military Supply Convoy In Downtown Mosul, Two Drivers Dead

 

October 23, 2004 MOSUL, Iraq (CBS 2) & By Robert H. Reid, ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

Partisans opened fire on a convoy of Turkish trucks in Mosul on Saturday, killing two drivers, a Turk and a Yugoslav, and wounding two others, hospital and police officials said.

 

Police said the drivers were ferrying supplies to the U.S. military here.

 

The attack occurred about noon in the center of the city.  Damaged vehicles could be seen at the site hours afterward.

 

Police and officials at Jumhuria Hospital said two drivers were killed and two were wounded.  Gunmen opened fire on a convoy of Turkish trucks in Mosul, killing two drivers – a Turk and a Yugoslav – and wounding two others, hospital and police officials said.

 

 

Resistance Takes Out Two More Pipelines To Dora Refinery

 

October 23, 2004 BAGHDAD (Reuters)

 

Saboteurs have bombed two oil pipelines transporting crude from north and eastern Iraq to Baghdad's Dora refinery, oil security officials said on Saturday.

 

Major Ali Mahmoud said National Guard forces were trying to extinguish a fire which damaged 150 yards of the Khana pipeline northeast of Baghdad.  He said another bomb was found on Saturday along the same line and was safely defused.

 

An oil official said saboteurs on Friday blew up a section of another oil pipeline in Mashahdeh area, around 31 miles north of Baghdad.  The pipeline feeds the same refinery which processes 110,000 barrels per day (bpd).

 

 

Film Clips: Resistance Attacks On Convoys

 

A truck is seen burning near the town of Balidiyat after the five-truck convoy was ambushed as the drivers were heading back to Turkey after delivering to US military bases.(AFP/Mujahed Mohammed)

 

Video 1

http://www.abolkhaseb.net/media/vedio/shot1.wmv

 

Video 2,

http://www.abolkhaseb.net/media/vedio/shot2.wmv

 

Video 3

http://www.abolkhaseb.net/media/vedio/shot3.wmv

 

 

Iraq Militants Say Behead Collaborator

 

23 October 2004 (Reuters)

 

DUBAI - An Iraqi militant group said it beheaded an Iraqi man it accused of collaborating with US forces and posted pictures of the killing on the Internet.

 

The Army of Ansar al-Sunna said in a statement posted on its Web site on Saturday it had captured the man in the northern Iraqi city of Mosul where he was working at a U.S. base.

 

“The mujahideen in the city of Mosul succeeded in capturing a weak-willed individual living off the blood of the mujahideen who was recruited as a crusader spy by the American forces,” said the statement dated Saturday.

 

 

 

FORWARD OBSERVATIONS

 

 

Zarqawi?  Bullshit!!

 

Sami Ramadani, September 30, 2004 The Guardian.  Sami Ramadani was a political refugee from Saddam Hussein's regime and is a senior lecturer at London Metropolitan University

 

The occupation forces have admitted that the attacks on them by the resistance rose last month to 2,700.  And how many of these 2,700 attacks a month were claimed by Zarqawi?  Six.  Six headline-grabbing, TV-dominating, stomach-churning moments.

 

Just as Iraq's 25 million people were reduced, in the public's mind, to the threat from weapons of mass destruction, ready to be unleashed within 45 minutes, the resistance is now being reduced to a single hoodlum.

 

 

 

OCCUPATION REPORT

 

 

Baghdad Cluster Fuck:

Iraqis Have To Bribe Cops To Turn In Their Weapons

 

10.16.04 By RICHARD A. OPPEL Jr., New York Time

 

BAGHDAD, Iraq, Oct. 15 — Kadham Jabar had a simple plan to satisfy his daughter’s curiosity about American dollars.  It involved a woven white sack filled with two dozen rocket-propelled grenade cartridges.

 

Mr. Jabar lugged the sack of weapons to a rundown stadium in the Habibiya section of the Sadr City district here on Thursday, the day before the scheduled end of a weapons-for-cash exchange intended to disarm the militiamen loyal to the Shiite cleric Moktada al-Sadr who patrol this sprawling, dusty, trash-strewn neighborhood in northeast Baghdad.

 

But Friday afternoon, Mr. Jabar was still standing outside, near the Iraqi National Guard troops selecting who would be let into the exchange.  He still had the weapons, and no dollars.

 

Mr. Jabar said the Iraqi troops were demanding to be paid money before they would allow people in.

 

On television, Iraqi officials had promised a nice return for weapons — $170 for each grenade launcher, for instance.  Mr. Jabar was deeply frustrated.  “I don’t have the money to get let in,” he said.  His daughter, he said, plays a game with friends that involves fake dollar bills, and “I just wanted her to see a real dollar.”

 

Nearby, among small boys carrying Kalashnikov assault rifles and a man sitting with an anti-aircraft weapon, Khadar Karim Hassan complained that the Iraqi troops were not paying as much for the weapons as had been promised.

 

They had stopped accepting some weapons altogether, he said.

 

“We are looking for peace, but if they are not going to take the weapons and pay what they said they would,” Mr. Hassan said, the people in Sadr City “are going to do bad things with them.”

 

Mr. Hassan and a group of men standing around him also said Iraqi troops were demanding money to be let in to the weapons-exchange area.

 

When a reporter, a photographer and an interpreter approached the exchange area, behind a long wall in front of the stadium, a masked Iraqi guardsman ordered them to leave.  Another guardsman approached, clicking the safety off his automatic weapon.

 

Outside, in a crowd of gunwielding Shiites, Iraqi guardsmen approached and said that if the journalists did not leave, they would be arrested.

 

One guardsman — before the question could be put to him — volunteered a denial that bribes required for entry to the change.  “These people are liars,” he said.

 

OCCUPATION ISN’T LIBERATION

BRING ALL THE TROOPS HOME NOW!

 

 

Iraqis Don't Care Who Wins U.S. Presidency

 

[Miami Herald, October 22, 2004]

 

Most Iraqis told polls they don't think it matters which candidate is the next U.S. president.    They believe the election process is fixed and that U.S. policy toward Iraq won't change no matter who wins.  [Imagine that.  And just because neither Bush nor Kerry nor Nader want to bring the troops home now.]

 

 

US Raids Computer Centers, Internet Cafes To Quell Resistance Reporting

 

Oct 22, 2004 By Omar Al-Fair, JUS

 

In a continuing effort to silence information coming out of Iraq, US forces began early this week an offensive against Iraq’s computer centers and Internet cafes.

 

On Tuesday US occupation forces raided an internet center in the city of Bayji, 180km north of Baghdad.  The owner of the establishment, Ali Hamid, told Reuters that “members of the US forces raided the center this [Tuesday] morning and took five computers and their equipment.”  Hamid noted, “This isn’t the first time the Americans have raided the center and took computers.  Some time ago they did the same thing and they took a number of computers then too.”

 

Residents of the city of Samarra’, 100km north of Baghdad, were quoted by Mafkarat al-Islam as saying that similar raids had taken place on computer cafes in their area as well.  There the American troops “confiscated the contents of the as-Safir Internet Center and, in particular, all its computers.”

 

In recent weeks, the US has employed a variety of strategies to stop the information flow, including bombing “strategic targets” of communications towers, Telecom switches and grids.  In addition, satellite phone operators have become legitimate targets of US air strikes as signals are picked up on US GPS systems.

 

The US has also stepped up its efforts to control information at home in advance of the elections. Several large ISPs in the Middle East have been blocked en mass, and pressure has been put on even the so called “uncensored” new outlets.

 

 

 

AFGHANISTAN WAR REPORTS

 

 

Bagram: Burger Kings And Manicures

 

US troops patrol in a village near the US-led coalition's Bagram Air Base north of Kabul. [Really?  U.S. Troops?  How about #3 with the full beard?  Different regs over there?]  (AFP/File/Shah Marai)

 

 

September 29, 2004 The Pak Tribune

 

BAGRAM: Nobody said the hunt for Osama bin Laden would be easy.  It's Sunday evening at Bagram air base, the US military hub in Afghanistan, and Specialist Henry Carter has booked himself a little treat.

 

"It's a manicure," he explains, as a beautician dips his outstretched fingers into a bowl of warm water at the base day spa.

 

"Helps me relax," he adds, a little bashfully.

 

In the next chair, a soldier is having his eyebrows trimmed; behind the curtain another is mid-pedicure.

 

At reception, Sergeant Gregory Duda flicks through a copy of the National Enquirer - M-16 rifle by his side - waiting for his weekly massage.  All 12 booths are occupied.

 

There is no contradiction between body care and military machismo, says the intelligence officer from Georgia.  "It keeps you ready," he says.  "Sore muscles can really inhibit if you have to fight."

 

The US president, George Bush, has vowed to keep his army in Afghanistan for the long haul. He has just deployed another 1,000 soldiers to support the country's October 9 election.  And as long as Operation Enduring Freedom lasts, his generals want to keep their troops happy, healthy and, if necessary, moisturised.

 

Bagram is a fortress-like base, surrounded by walls, sandbags and razor wire.  Outside the gates children beg passing troops for pens.  But inside is a cornucopia of modern conveniences: a music, food and electronics store; internet and video halls; esoteric gift outlets; a beauty spa; and, since July, Afghanistan's first Burger King.

 

"We know we're going to be here for a while," says Major Stacy Bathrick, a public affairs officer. "If the soldiers have a good quality of life [on base], it means their morale is high when out on mission."

 

The base store - commonly known as the Postal Exchange - sells everything from pistol holders to DVDs, microwave meals and Osama bin Laden T-shirts.  Soldiers are well fed, said Kenneth Limtiaco of AAFES, the company that runs the shops.  "But if you want a _mocha frappuccino, you can't get it in the mess hall."

 

Neither can you get a bust of Lenin or a souvenir medal to mark the "Order of the Red Flag Socialist competition" - some of the items on sale at the Soviet-themed gift shop.

 

It's cheap - 20% less than in the US, says Mr Limtiaco.  The beauty salon, which offers a full-body massage for $15 (8.30), recently extended to a 15-hour day to meet demand.

 

There are plans for expansion.  Pizza Hut and Subway outlets are on the way, and another Burger King is destined for the southern base in Kandahar.  AAFES reinvests the profits into other facilities, including a gymnasium complete with a mountain-climbing wall, internet cafes, phone centres and distance learning classes.  For the less active there are PlayStation consoles, free popcorn and satellite TV.

 

There is also a strong social element.  In Kandahar the 24-hour Green Beans coffee shop has become the base's social focus.  Thursday is salsa night, when soldiers gather to tango into the night.  "It's really fun," says Specialist Cassie Gonzalez, a Texan architecture student who suspended her studies for military service.

 

Camp life is far less luxurious at the remote "firebases", where front-line troops are working on reconstruction and hunting the Taliban remnants.  There is little power or running water and the threat of death lurks: three American soldiers were killed last week.

 

But there is room for occasional extravagances.  At Camp Anaconda in arid Uruzgan province, troops celebrated a resupply run last week with a lobster-and-steak dinner.

 

Fun at the major bases is subject to two restrictions: no alcohol, and no sex between soldiers.  The top brass take an indulgent approach to the second rule, says one woman soldier:  "If anyone thinks there's no sex, they're just kidding themselves," she says.

 

There is no such ambiguity at the Bagram beauty salon, staffed by hairdressers and beauticians from the central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan.

 

A notice tells customers to wear underpants, and warns: "Soliciting any sexual or indecent services/acts is subject to punishment under the Military Code of Uniform Justice."

 

Tania Mitko, the 24-year-old manager, says: "We're just here to work normally - that's all. Sometimes the soldiers ask us out for a coffee and a talk.  But we always say no."

 

 

Three Foreign Soldiers Wounded In Grenade Attack

 

10.22.04 AP An attacker detonated grenades on a commercial street in downtown Kabul on Saturday, killing himself and injuring seven other people, including three foreign soldiers, police said.

 

 

 

DANGER: POLITICIANS AT WORK

 

 

 

 

 

Received:

 

Reader Sends Respect And Solidarity To 17 Who Defied Suicide Orders

 

From: B, NYC

To: GI Special

Sent:, October 22, 2004 9:45 PM

Subject: GI Special--comments

 

I have for months, and especially these past few weeks, been scouring the Internet for alternative news on the situation in Iraq, and particularly from the troops themselves. So it was with tremendous relief tonight when I ran across the GI Special site.

 

I've only had the chance to read one report thus far (extremely poignant: GI Special 2#B95), but I do intend to read on. And, I can only hope that these stories somehow reach the due attention of the mainstream media.  Because right now, more than anything else, the American public needs to hear the voices of our young men and women, whom this Administration has so cavalierly sacrificed.

 

At such a crucial juncture in this war--with the Stop-loss program taking place, and the real possibility of a draft being reinstated, and what appears to be an ever-imploding chaos all throughout Iraq--the troops are our most reliable source for understanding what is going on over there, and what the troops are up against w/ our own military and the consequences of this Administration's policies.

 

For what it is worth: My wholehearted support to the heroic 17 troops who valiantly refused to go on the suicidal mission they were ordered to undertake.

 

All best,

B. NYC

 

 

Received:

 

JUST A REMINDER

 

Operation Wave of Prayer and Sound

by

Brandie Lampin

Wife of medically unfit Soldier forced into Iraq

 

 

On Nov. 1st, before the elections, when it gets to be 11:58 AM

wherever you are, let’s start

OPERATION WAVE OF PRAYER AND SOUND

 

If you support our troops,

If you want the medically unfit sent home,

If you want them all sent home,

Stop what you are doing wherever you are.

Go outside with your family, friends or even your neighbor

and pray that this war will end.

 

Then at 12:00 PM,

Go to your vehicle if you have one

and honk the horn for 30 seconds.

Make it loud enough America!

 

Make it so that the wave of prayers and sound

reach our troops to show them that we care.

BRING THEM HOME!!!

 

This mission has been posted on the internet as a chain letter.  I am trying to get all of America to make this happen. In order to make this a wave of prayer and sound, this must be followed by your own time/zone in your state.

 

So the first states that will start this should be along the East Coast, then work its way west.

 

So past it on to people you know and have them pass it to people they know and so on.  Let us prove that this mission WILL BE ACCOMPLISHED!

 

 

Received:

 

Armed Forces Resistance Grows

 

From: "max watts"

Sent: October 22, 2004 4:16 AM

Subject: Re: beginning - but of what?

 

WHAT I WANT TO POINT OUT IS THE SAME MESSAGE YOU HAVE SEEN IN TRAVELING SOLDIER AND GI SPECIAL NOW: THAT THERE IS A CHANGE, AND RELATIVELY RAPID, IN THE FORMS OF RESISTANCE IN THE ARMED FORCES (RITA) WE ARE SEEING IN IRAQ.

 

AS TRAVELING SOLDIER HAS NOTED - THE "INDIVIDUAL HERO" CAN BE CRUSHED FAR MORE EASILY THAN A GROUP.

 

ACTUALLY, OUR EXPERIENCE DURING VIETNAM WAS THAT THESE ARE NOT CONTRADICTORY, OR CONFLICTING, ACTIONS:  RITA IS AS RITA DOES, AND THE RITA SOLDIERS THEMSELVES ARE THE ONES WHO DECIDE ON THE FORM OF ACTION.

 

AROUND 1968 I NOTED THAT BY THEN RITA IN THE US/VIETNAM WAR HAD GONE THRU SEVERAL PHASES:

 

(AND OF COURSE I WROTE ABOUT THOSE WHICH HAD BECOME KNOWN TO ME, MUCH HAPPENED ELSEWHERE, "IN THE DARK").

 

IT HAD STARTED OUT WITH "INDIVIDUAL HEROISM", ONE, 2, THEN 3 GI'S SAYING: "NO, WE WON'T GO" -THESE GI'S OFTEN GOT 3-5 YEARS AND MORE JAIL SENTENCES.

 

HOWEVER, THEY WERE NOT ATTACKED BY OTHER PRISONERS IN THE STOCKADES, OR FED PRISONS, AS HAD OCCURRED TO LEFTISTS DURING THE KOREAN WAR PERIOD.  THE OTHER PRISONERS MORE OR LESS ADMIRED THEM, BUT THOUGHT THEY SHOULD HAVE DESERTED, INSTEAD OF HANGING AROUND FOR TRIALS AND JAIL

 

NEXT WE NOTED - GROWING DESERTION, AND IN EUROPE: "OFF BASE" RITA, SOLDIERS IN FRANCE, SWEDEN, CANADA, ORGANISING AND - FROM FRANCE MOSTLY - MAINTAINING CONTACTS WITH THEIR UNITS IN GERMANY

 

SO FROM SIMPLE DESERTION, TO POLITICAL DESERTION/AWOL, (WITH GI'S MAKING STATEMENTS TO THE MEDIA AS TO WHY THEY'D SPLIT) AND THEN "OFF-BASE-RITA" WITH CONTACTS...

 

NOW, THAT WAS V IMPORTANT, BECAUSE IT TOLD GI'S INSIDE THAT IF THEY NEEDED, THEY COULD SPLIT.  (EXAMPLE: TERRY KLUG, STUCK IN ITALY, READ ABOUT PARIS IN THE ROME DAILY AMERICAN... AND HEADED PARISWARDS)

 

PERRIN, WHO HAD RESISTED IN FORT SILL, AND TRIED TO IN KITZINGEN (GERMANY) FELT HE COULDN'T HACK IT ANY MORE (TOO MUCH RACISM IN HIS UNIT) AND SPLIT TO PARIS, WHERE HE DID MARVELS..

 

NOW, THIS IS 1966-67

 

BY EARLY 1968, PARTICULARLY AFTER TET, THE BALANCE OF POWER INSIDE THE ARMY WAS SWINGING OUR WAY.  AND NOW GI'S WERE COMING TO VISIT THE OFF-BASE RITAS, DISCUSS, PICK UP LITERATURE, AND GOING BACK TO THEIR UNITS IN GERMANY, "WITH THE NEWS".

 

SOMETIMES THEY EVEN PARTICIPATED IN THE BARRICADE BATTLES IN MAY 1968 PARIS, BEFORE GOING BACK..

 

NOW IT BECAME POSSIBLE TO WORK MORE AND MORE OPENLY ON BASE, PUT OUT BASE PAPERS, LINK UP TO GERMAN LEFTISTS, AND ... AS THE YEARS WENT ON... COME OUT IN THE OPEN.

 

I FELT (I'M FAR AWAY, PLEASE, THIS IS A FEELING OF COURSE I CAN BE WRONG, BUT? AM I?) THAT THE RESISTANCE IN THE US MILITARY IS ABOUT TO ENTER A NEW PHASE.

 

WELL... THE 343RD QM CO... COULD NOT HAVE HAPPENED A YEAR AGO... OR 6 MONTHS ?

 

AND THE WORK OF THE WIVES, MOTHERS, IS ALSO GOING TO A NEW, HIGHER, STRONGER, LEVEL...

 

AM I DELUDING MYSELF?  OR ??

 

WE SHALL SEE

 

KEEP UP YOUR VERY GOOD WORK.  I HAVE DOWNLOADED TRAVELING SOLDIER #8 AND WILL XEROX COPIES, FOR PRINT SNAIL MAIL DISTRIB.

 

ALL VERY BEST

 

MAX WATTS

 

 

Received:

 

You Got That Right!

 

Ralph Nader is a hypocrite.  He is NOT an antiwar candidate.  He wants the US to have the cover of the United Nations.  He does not stand up for Iraqi self-determination.

 

From his web site:

"The quagmire of the Iraq war and occupation could have been averted and needs to be ended expeditiously, replacing US forces with a UN peacekeeping force, prompt supervised elections and humanitarian assistance before we sink deeper into this occupation, with more U.S. casualties, huge financial costs, and diminished US security around and from the Islamic world."

http://www.votenader.org/issues/index.php?cid=17

 

Adam Richmond

 

 

Received:

 

We would like to receive your regular email GI Specials.  Stephen Darley, anti-war activist in Adelaide Australia, recommended you to us.  We are politically-active independent printers who would like to use your material (with attribution of course) to advance anti-war work in Australia.  Is this okay with you?

 

J and B, S Printing, Adelaide, Australia.

 

Reply: 

 

Yes.  And check out Traveling Soldier, at: http://www.traveling-soldier.org/   T

 

 

GI Special distributes and posts to our website copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner.  We are making such material available in an effort to advance understanding of the invasion and occupation of Iraq.  We believe this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law since it is being distributed without charge or profit for purely educational purposes to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for educational purposes, in accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107.  Go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. for more information.  If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

 

If printed out, this newsletter is your personal property and cannot legally be confiscated from you.  “Possession of unauthorized material may not be prohibited.”  DoD Directive 1325.6 Section 3.5.1.2.